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Table 1 Patient characteristics at baseline

From: Identification of prognostic alternative splicing events related to the immune microenvironment of hepatocellular carcinoma

Characteristic Number (%)
Diagnosis age  
 < 60 201 (54.3)
 ≥ 60 169 (45.7)
Median age (range), years 53 (16–90)
Gender  
male 250 (67.6)
female 120 (32.4)
Origin (race)  
Asia 158 (42.7)
Non-Asia 212 (57.3)
Ethnicity  
Hispanic or Latino 132 (35.7)
Not Hispanic or Latino 227 (61.4)
NA 11 (2.9)
ECOG performance status scorea  
0 162 (43.8)
1 84 (22.7)
2 26 (7.0)
 > 2 98 (26.5)
Child–Pugh classification gradeb  
A 216 (58.4)
B 21 (5.7)
C 1 (0.2)
NA 132 (35.7)
Disease Stage (American Joint Committee on Cancer)
Stage I–II 256 (69.2)
Stage III 85 (23.0)
Stage IV 5 (1.3)
NA 24 (6.5)
AFP  
 ≥ 400 ng per milliliter 64 (17.3)
 < 400 ng per milliliter 213 (57.6)
NA 93 (25.1)
Family history of cancer  
Yes 112 (30.3)
No 207 (55.9)
NA 51 (13.8)
Histologic gradec  
G1 55 (14.9)
G2 177 (47.8)
G3 121 (32.7)
G4 12 (3.3)
NA 5 (1.3)
Adjacent hepatic tissue inflammation extent type
None 117 (31.6)
Mild 99 (26.8)
Severe 17 (4.6)
NA 137 (37.0)
  1. aEastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG) scores range from 0 to 5, with higher numbers indicating poorer health
  2. bThe Child–Pugh classification grade is a three-category scale (A, with scores of 5 or 6, indicating good hepatic function; B, with scores of 7 to 9, indicating moderately impaired hepatic function; or C, with scores of 10 to 15, indicating advanced hepatic dysfunction). Classification is determined by scoring according to the presence and severity of five clinical measures of liver disease (encephalopathy, ascites, bilirubin levels, albumin levels, and prolonged prothrombin time)
  3. cThe histologic grade of hepatocellular carcinoma is based on Edmondson's classification, which can be divided into four grades. The higher the grade, the worse the differentiation